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Monday - April 05, 2010

From: Deland, FL
Region: Southeast
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Slow growing, non-native Viburnum sandanqua in Deland FL
Answered by: Barbara Medford


Hi. I live in central FL, and planted sandankwa viburnum as a hedge 3 years ago. I was told they would grow quickly, but they are growing very slowly, although they look healthy with deep green leaves. What can I do to speed things up?


The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is dedicated to the use, protection and propagation of plants native not only to North America but to the area in which the plants are being grown. According to this Floridata website Viburnum suspensum, Sandanqua Viburnum, is a native of Okinawa and other members of the Ryuku Island Chain. It is hardy in USDA Hardiness Zones 8 to 10; since you are in Zone 9a, it is comfortable where it is. The Floridata site said it had a "fairly rapid" growth, needed part shade to shade and good drainage. Plant retailers would be able to translate "fairly" into "rapid growing." We know of no way to speed up a plant's growth beyond satisfying all of its growing requirements, and even then, it will do what its genetic background tells it to do.


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