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Friday - April 02, 2010

From: Georgetown, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Evergreen tree to provide block for treehouse in Central Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I live close to Austin TX and need an evergreen tree to block neighbor's newly constructed, metal roof tree house. It looms over our garden and yard - can you suggest a nice evergreen tree for hot morning sun with afternoon partial shade? Our soil is rocky and alkaline. Thanks.

ANSWER:

Here evergreen trees native to the Austin/Georgetown area.  All of these grow to at least 25 feet high.

Juniperus virginiana (eastern redcedar) and here is more information

Quercus fusiformis (plateau oak)

Ilex vomitoria (yaupon)

Condalia hookeri (Brazilian bluewood) and here is more information

Sophora secundiflora (Texas mountain-laurel)

Prunus caroliniana (Carolina laurelcherry)

Here are some smaller native evergreen trees/shrubs that could also work. These all grow to around 12 feet high.

Garrya ovata (eggleaf silktassel)

Morella cerifera (wax myrtle) There are dwarf varieties of wax myrtle so, if you purchase one from a nursery, you need to check carefully to avoid getting one of these.

Rhus virens (evergreen sumac)

Here are photos of the above from our Image Gallery:


Juniperus virginiana

Quercus fusiformis

Ilex vomitoria

Condalia hookeri

Sophora secundiflora

Prunus caroliniana

Garrya ovata

Morella cerifera

Rhus virens

 

 

 

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