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Tuesday - March 16, 2010

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Trees blooming white in Austin area
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

3/16/10 What are the trees that are blooming white in the Austin area. They are a full tree and very prolific in the area.

ANSWER:

There are two possibilities: One is Prunus mexicana (Mexican plum), which is native to Central Texas and the other is Pyrus calleryana, Bradford Pear, which is native to temperate and tropical China, but has been introduced into Southeastern states in North America. More information and pictures from Invasives.org. If neither of these fit the tree you are seeing, go to Mr. Smarty Plants instructions for obtaining a plant identification, submit a photo. The tree you are seeing might be another non-native to North America, as well as the Bradford Pear, and therefore not in our Native Plant Database, but sometimes we can figure it out. 

From our Native Plant Image Gallery:


Prunus mexicana

Prunus mexicana

Prunus mexicana

Prunus mexicana

 

 

 

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