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Sunday - March 21, 2010

From: Albany, GA
Region: Southeast
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Wildflowers for Area Around Drainage Pond in Georgia
Answered by: Nina Hawkins

QUESTION:

We have a drainage pond behind our business in Albany, Georgia and would like to plant about an acre of wildflowers around it to help with soil erosion and to help keep weeds from taking over again, we just cleaned it out. Do you know an inexpensive type of perennial wildflower we could plant that would thrive here.

ANSWER:

To successfully repopulate the area around your drainage pond with wildflowers rather than "weeds" you'll want to use a seed mix (or two) that contains a variety of annual and perennial wildflowers and grasses rather than just picking one or two specific perennial wildflowers to seed.  The annuals will reseed themselves and come back the next year and a wide variety of species will provide blooms at different times of the year.  The grasses are especially important, because their extensive root systems will hold the soil in place and fill in the spaces between the flowering plants that would otherwise invite undesirables.  You can check our Suppliers list or do a little searching on the internet for wildflower seed companies that sell in bulk for this very purpose.  The seller should have different wildflower and grass mixes tailored to specific soil types and conditions so that you can purchase the mix that is right for your land.  They will also have information about seeding rates that will tell you how much seed you'll need for the area of land you are trying to cover.  Don't skimp - or you could end up back at square one with a weed meadow rather than the beautiful wildflower meadow flitting with bees and butterflies that you're dreaming of.  Below I've listed a few attractive grasses and wildflowers that are native to Georgia that would likely be included in the seed mix that you choose.  You'll find many others by searching our Plant Database or the Recommended Species list for Georgia.

Panicum virgatum (switchgrass)

Sorghastrum nutans (Indiangrass)

Andropogon gerardii (big bluestem)

Bouteloua curtipendula (sideoats grama)

Monarda fistulosa(wild bergamot)

Rudbeckia laciniata (cutleaf coneflower)

Eupatoriadelphus fistulosus (trumpetweed)

Rudbeckia hirta

Penstemon digitalis (talus slope penstemon)(blackeyed Susan)

Oenothera speciosa (pinkladies)


Panicum virgatum

Sorghastrum nutans

Andropogon gerardii

Bouteloua curtipendula

Monarda fistulosa

Rudbeckia laciniata

Eupatoriadelphus fistulosus

Rudbeckia hirta

Penstemon digitalis

Oenothera speciosa

 

 

 

 

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