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Mr. Smarty Plants - Native plants growing between Eagle Pass and Del Rio, TX

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Tuesday - October 25, 2005

From: Quemado, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Native plants growing between Eagle Pass and Del Rio, TX
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I have just bought an acre near Quemado, Texas. That's about halfway between Eagle Pass and Del Rio. I'd like to know what the native plants for this area are, especially colorful flowers for the spring and summer.

ANSWER:

Here is a list of some common colorful flowers that you will find blooming in your area:
1. Huisache daisy (Amblyolepis setigera)
2. Indian blanket (Gaillardia pulchella)
3. Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)
4. Mexican hat (Ratibida columnifera)
5. Desert marigold (Baileya multiradiata)
6. Cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis)
7. Prairie paintbrush (Castilleja purpurea)
8. Texas lantana (Lantana urticoides)
9. Zexmenia (Wedelia texana)
10. Damianita (Chrysactinia mexicana)
11. Red-flowered false yucca (Hesperaloe parviflora)
12. Various species of Opuntia cactus (Opuntia spp.) such as O. engelmannii, O. leptocaulis, O. phaeacantha.
13. Various species of Yucca such as Y. constricta, Y. treculeana, Y. torrei.

There are many more possibilities. I suggest you consult "Wildflowers of the Western Plains" by Zoe M. Kirkpatrick, 1992, University of Texas Press, to see more possibilities. Another excellent book for your region is "Wildflowers of the Big Bend Country" by Barton H. Warnock. 1970. Sul Ross State University. This book is sadly out of print, but you might be able to find a copy in your local library.

I assume you are considering planting wildflowers on your property. You might like to take a look at the articles about wildflower gardening, such as "Wildflower Meadow Gardening", in our Native Plant Library. To find a source for native seeds in your area, you can visit the National Suppliers Directory. Finally, since your area is rather dry, you might consider sowing your seeds using seed balls.
 

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