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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Sunday - October 16, 2005

From: Round Rock, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: General Botany, Plant Identification
Title: Smarty Plants on forbs
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What kind of plant is a forb? I see the term used frequently in reference to grasses (I think), but I can't figure out exactly what a forb is.

ANSWER:

A forb is any herbaceous (non-woody) flowering plant that is not a grass or grass-like (sedges or rushes). The term is usually used in reference to those plants growing with grasses in fields, meadows or prairies. Some examples of forbs are dandelions, clover, bluebonnets, columbines, milkweeds, larkspurs, phlox and many, many more.

 

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