Explore Plants

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 

Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Saturday - November 21, 2009

From: San Antonio, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Identifying problem with non-native plumbagos in San Antonio
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Barbara Medford answered my question on plumbagos..we have the ones that grow crazy in TX (not sure which species, but w/ the bright blue/purple blooms..). I have pictures and wasn't sure where to send so you can see the way the ones are growing in one bed versus another. I've heard how you can hardly kill these plants, they are very hardy, etc. and the others are great. So I was just curious if maybe an animal, like a cat maybe, peeing on the bushes, if that would cause them to be this way? Thanks again, let me know and I can email the pics. Kristin

ANSWER:

Cetainly you can send us some pictures. Go to the Mr. Smarty Plants Plant Identification page and you will get instructions to do so.

Now let's get back to your previous question and the answer from Mr. Smarty Plants. You will note that the three illustrations we provided in that answer are all of Plumbago scandens (doctorbush), which is the only plumbago native to Texas, and they are white. Just because something grows well in Texas does not necessarily mean it is native to Texas. If you will notice in that answer we gave you a link to a Floridata article on Plumbago auriculata, native to South Africa. If you read that article you will see the pictures of bright blue blooms, and those almost surely are the ones you have.

We have no way of knowing, even if we look at the pictures, if animal damage is causing the problem you are having. You might contact the Texas A&M AgriLIFE Extension office for Bexar County and see if they can give you some guidance.  

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Non-native pothos ivy from Houston
May 30, 2013 - My pothos devils ivy is about 5 years old and grows outside. A couple of years ago its leaves became spectacularly large, like 12" wide and its stalk about 1 - 2" wide. A couple of years ago i gui...
view the full question and answer

When should I plant bermuda grass seeds?
February 10, 2010 - When should I plant bermuda grass seeds?
view the full question and answer

Invasiveness of non-native Asian jasmine
June 18, 2007 - I have a lot of Asian Jasmine planted as groundcover in various beds. The last year or so it has become unruly and is now invading my St. Augustine, working its way into the lawn itself. Is there an...
view the full question and answer

Seeking information on Crateeva asiatica, non-native herbal medicine
September 29, 2007 - Dear Mr. Smarty Plants, I had a look at your website in hope of finding information about the plant Crateeva asiatica. Could you kindly help me to locate the information for the same?
view the full question and answer

Alternatives to non-native heather (Calluna vulgaris)
April 27, 2007 - I live in Vernon, BC, Canada. I plan to put a heather plant in my garden, but my space is limited. I know that it will grow approx. 2 ft. high and that it likes well drained and acidic soil, but how...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.