Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Friday - November 20, 2009

From: Gilbertsville, PA
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Problems with non-native nectarine in Gilbertsville PA
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I live in southeastern Pennsylvania. I have a mature nectarine tree maybe 14 years old. It has a greenish grey spotting on the trunk and branches, the fruit always turns into the brown mummies and for many years has had leaf curl. I used a product called Serenade biofungicide and this year there was no curl but all fruits were mummies. Is it worth trying to save this tree? What would help it if I prefer not to spray chemicals that would be toxic to birds, critters, water supply. Thanks!

ANSWER:

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is dedicated to the growth, propagation and preservation of plants native not only to North America but to the area in which they are being grown. Prunus persica var. nucipersica is native not to Persia (now Iran), as the name implies, but to Central and southern Asia, specifically China. Apparently most of the nectarines, which is really just a smooth peach, sold commercially are grown in California. They are considered hardy to USDA Hardiness Zones 5 to 8. Montgomery County, PA appears to be in Zone 6, so the temperatures should not be a factor. The peach and nectarine are very susceptible to a number of serious disease problems, including peach leaf curl, brown rot, bacterial leaf spot and canker. Since it is non-native and therefore out of our range of expertise, we suggest you contact the Penn State Cooperative Extension Office for Montgomery County to see if they have any suggestions for treatment. 

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Will non-native hostas do well in South Carolina from Seneca SC
May 20, 2013 - I am moving to SC from CT and want to bring some of the hostas I grow in CT. If I plant them in the shade in SC, will they do well down there?
view the full question and answer

Deadheading a petunia and why
July 13, 2008 - Can you please tell me the correct way to de-head a petunia and why?
view the full question and answer

Is Hibiscus coccineus still considered native in Dallas, TX?
July 15, 2011 - Is Hibiscus coccineus still considered native?. I recently was told by someone with the Native Texas Plant Society that it was no longer thought to have crossed the Sabine naturally. Thoughts...
view the full question and answer

Leaves browning on non-native willow from in Cumbla PA
July 10, 2011 - We recently planted a willow tree. A lot of the leaves turned yellow and some turned brown, but it is also getting some new buds. my question is, should I take the dead leaves off or leave them there...
view the full question and answer

Problems with non-native Pink Jasmine from Austin
March 23, 2011 - A week or so ago, I purchased two beautiful pink jasmine vines. The first few days after planting, they did wonderful. Now, some leaves and stems are turning brown and some flowers have fallen off. ...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.