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Wednesday - October 21, 2009

From: Charlottesville, VA
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Rain Gardens
Title: Edible Plants for a Virginia Rain Garden
Answered by: Dean Garrett

QUESTION:

Can you recommend edible plants that would be appropriate for use in a rain garden? I'm located in Charlottesville, VA, but this can be in general as well.

ANSWER:

There are several edible plants native to your area that should do well in the seasonal poor drainge of a rain garden.

Leaves for teas and seasoning:

Edible fruit:

Edible roots:

That should get you started. For more information about rain gardens in your state, check out this .pdf file from the Virginia Department of Forestry: Rain Gardens Technical Guide.


Monarda didyma

Pycnanthemum virginianum

Salvia lyrata

Lindera benzoin

Persea borbonia

Asimina triloba

Vaccinium corymbosum

Morus rubra

Rubus idaeus ssp. strigosus

Rubus trivialis

Helianthus tuberosus

 


Monarda clinopodia
 

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