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Wednesday - October 21, 2009

From: Raleigh, NC
Region: Southeast
Topic: Shrubs
Title: Evergreen shrubs for full sun in North Carolina
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

We need suggestions for native NC evergreen shrubs that will grow well in full sun for a school garden. Most of what I've found likes part shade. We need something that will not be over 10 feet or can be pruned. Will the leucothoe/ilex species tolerate full sun in Raleigh NC. Thanks so much!

ANSWER:

Ilex glabra (inkberry), Ilex myrtifolia (myrtle dahoon), and Ilex vomitoria (yaupon) should all do well in partial shade and full sun. However, according to University of Connecticut Plant Database, Leucothoe axillaris (coastal doghobble) and Leucothoe fontanesiana (highland doghobble) do best in partial shade.

Here are some other evergreen shrubs that are native to North Carolina that should thrive in full sun.  However, you should check the other 'Growing Conditions' on each species' page to determine if they meet the conditions of your site:

Gordonia lasianthus (loblolly bay)

Chamaedaphne calyculata (leatherleaf)

Juniperus communis var. depressa (common juniper) and here are photos and more information.

Kalmia latifolia (mountain laurel)

Morella cerifera (wax myrtle)

Morella caroliniensis (southern bayberry) and here are photos.

Morella pensylvanica (northern bayberry)

Sabal minor (dwarf palmetto)

Taxus canadensis (Canada yew) and here are photos.


Ilex glabra

Ilex myrtifolia

Ilex vomitoria

Gordonia lasianthus

Chamaedaphne calyculata

Kalmia latifolia

Morella cerifera

Morella pensylvanica

Sabal minor

 

 
 

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