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A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Thursday - October 15, 2009

From: Duluth, GA
Region: Southeast
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: New plant introductions in Georgia.
Answered by: Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

Can you list 5-10 brand new plants to the marketplace this 2009-2010 season for my area in GA? Thank you.

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants thinks you might be a little unclear on the function of the Native Plant Information Network and the mission of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.  We study and advocate for the use of wildflfowers and other native plants in their native areas.

Most new introductions to the horticulture market are cultivars of non-native species.  While it is certainly possible that someone has introduced some native plant species to the marketplace, it is very unlikely that anyone has introduced five to ten new ones in Georgia this year.

The Horticulture Department at the University of Georgia, under the direction of Dr. Allan Armitage maintains a The Trial Gardens at UGA for landscape testing new plant introductions.  He has also developed a marketing program called Athens Select which promotes especially well-adapted cultivars of intoduced plants.  These resources may be of value to you.

 

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