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Wednesday - October 07, 2009

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Plant identification, Oxalis drummondii
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

All around Austin in the last couple of weeks I've noticed a beautiful lavender flower blooming in dense clumps. I haven't been able to look at them closely because it seems they prefer to be in the medians, so it would be difficult if not downright dangerous to get closer. I've checked the database and it sure looks like Oxalis Drummondii, but since that plant prefers to grow at higher altitudes I'm not sure it's the same one. Any ideas about this one?

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants thinks you have identified correctly the pink/lavender flowers blooming around Austin right now.  The recent rains seem to have spurred Oxalis drummondii (Drummond's woodsorrel) to put on a spectacular display for us this October. Despite what the database says about liking higher elevations, it is quite happy growing and blooming here in Austin.

 


Oxalis drummondii

Oxalis drummondii

Oxalis drummondii

 

 

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