En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Texas natives for a small garden with red flowers

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Saturday - October 03, 2009

From: Cypress, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Herbs/Forbs, Vines
Title: Texas natives for a small garden with red flowers
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I have a garden that is 4' deep, what can I put there that is a Texas native, I would really like some color (preferably red)also it needs to be able to grow tall (8 - 10')

ANSWER:

Most plants that are going to grow 8 to 10 feet tall are going to be woody plants, i.e., shrubs or small trees.  Here are a few that have red blossoms and will do well in Harris County:

Aesculus pavia (red buckeye) grows up to 15 feet.

Erythrina herbacea (redcardinal) grows to 6 feet with beautiful red blossoms.

Cercis canadensis (eastern redbud) grows up to 30 feet.

Ilex decidua (possumhaw) produces red berries.

If you have a place for a vine, there are two that are evergreen and produce red flowers.  On a trellis you could grow them to 8 to 10 feet.

Lonicera sempervirens (trumpet honeysuckle)

Bignonia capreolata (crossvine)

There are a few perennial non-woody plants with red blossoms that grow relatively tall.  Here are three:

Ipomopsis rubra (standing-cypress) up to 6 feet tall.

Lobelia cardinalis (cardinalflower) up to 6 feet.

Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii (wax mallow) can grow up to 9 feet tall.

Now, it is possible that you were looking for red fall foliage.  If that is the case, you should send in another question to Mr. Smarty Plants and we will have another go at your request.


Aesculus pavia

Erythrina herbacea

Cercis canadensis

Ilex decidua

Lonicera sempervirens

Bignonia capreolata

Ipomopsis rubra

Lobelia cardinalis

Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii

 

 

 

 

More Vines Questions

How to graft muscadines?
June 07, 2013 - I have tried for the last two years, grafting my perfect muscadines to the native non-bearing vines. I have tried every method available to no avail. I usually get two or three leaves, then wilt and...
view the full question and answer

Is hummingbird vine poisonous to parrots?
June 26, 2011 - Is hummingbird vine poisonous to parrots? I am setting up vines and plants around the aviary and would like to use this vine if it's not poisonous.
view the full question and answer

Plants for pergola in Lubbock TX
May 29, 2013 - I need suggestions of plants, vines, bushes to plant in my backyard near my wooden pergola that will work well in full sun in Lubbock, TX. Ideally, I'd like some that attract hummingbirds and provide...
view the full question and answer

Are berries of coral honeysuckle edible from Lufkin TX
May 21, 2013 - Are the berries of coral honeysuckle edible?
view the full question and answer

Regenerating old cross-vines in Richardson, TX
June 26, 2008 - I have been asked to landscape a memorial garden at church. The garden is small and has a 10x 15-foot brick wall around the back in a c-shape in full sun. Planted on the wall are several very overgro...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center