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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Saturday - October 03, 2009

From: Cypress, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Herbs/Forbs, Vines
Title: Texas natives for a small garden with red flowers
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I have a garden that is 4' deep, what can I put there that is a Texas native, I would really like some color (preferably red)also it needs to be able to grow tall (8 - 10')

ANSWER:

Most plants that are going to grow 8 to 10 feet tall are going to be woody plants, i.e., shrubs or small trees.  Here are a few that have red blossoms and will do well in Harris County:

Aesculus pavia (red buckeye) grows up to 15 feet.

Erythrina herbacea (redcardinal) grows to 6 feet with beautiful red blossoms.

Cercis canadensis (eastern redbud) grows up to 30 feet.

Ilex decidua (possumhaw) produces red berries.

If you have a place for a vine, there are two that are evergreen and produce red flowers.  On a trellis you could grow them to 8 to 10 feet.

Lonicera sempervirens (trumpet honeysuckle)

Bignonia capreolata (crossvine)

There are a few perennial non-woody plants with red blossoms that grow relatively tall.  Here are three:

Ipomopsis rubra (standing-cypress) up to 6 feet tall.

Lobelia cardinalis (cardinalflower) up to 6 feet.

Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii (wax mallow) can grow up to 9 feet tall.

Now, it is possible that you were looking for red fall foliage.  If that is the case, you should send in another question to Mr. Smarty Plants and we will have another go at your request.


Aesculus pavia

Erythrina herbacea

Cercis canadensis

Ilex decidua

Lonicera sempervirens

Bignonia capreolata

Ipomopsis rubra

Lobelia cardinalis

Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii

 

 

 

 

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