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Monday - September 21, 2009

From: Quincy, IL
Region: Midwest
Topic: Propagation
Title: Nutlet on rudbekia plants from Quincy IL
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

On rudbeckia plants, what is a nutlet?

ANSWER:

There are 15 species of the genus Rudbeckia native to North America and 8 native to Illinois. We have chosen Rudbeckia hirta (blackeyed Susan) as our example. We don't know where you heard the term "nutlet" in connection with a rudbeckia; about all we can tell you is that ordinarily a "nutlet" is the seed for a particular plant; it may be a stone in a peach or cherry or an actual acorn, from an oak. From the USDA Plant Profile on this plant, there is one picture of the seeds. If that isn't what you would consider the nutlet of a rudbeckia, then we are at a loss.

From our Native Plant Image Gallery:


Rudbeckia hirta

Rudbeckia hirta

Rudbeckia hirta

 

 

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