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Wednesday - September 16, 2009

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Grasses or Grass-like, Herbs/Forbs, Shrubs, Vines
Title: Salt-tolerant plants in Central Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Do you have any suggestions for salt-tolerant plants in Central Texas? Thanks.

ANSWER:

Here are several perennial native plants that are salt tolerant and are known to grow in Travis County, Texas.

HERBACEOUS PLANTS

Achillea millefolium (common yarrow)

Artemisia ludoviciana (white sagebrush)

Asclepias tuberosa (butterfly milkweed)

Teucrium canadense (Canada germander)

ORNAMENTAL GRASSES

Tripsacum dactyloides (eastern gamagrass)

Tridens flavus (purpletop tridens)

SHRUBS/VINES

Morella cerifera (wax myrtle)

Lonicera sempervirens (trumpet honeysuckle)

Callicarpa americana (American beautyberry)

Erythrina herbacea (redcardinal) 


Achillea millefolium

Artemisia ludoviciana

Asclepias tuberosa

Teucrium canadense

Tripsacum dactyloides

Tridens flavus

Morella cerifera

Lonicera sempervirens

Callicarpa americana

Erythrina herbacea

 

 

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