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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Thursday - September 03, 2009

From: Toledo, OH
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Herbs/Forbs
Title: Vascular plants and mosses from Toledo OH
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Why do vascular plants grow taller and thicker than mosses?

ANSWER:

Since the Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center is committed to the use, preservation and propagation of vascular plants native to North America and to the area in which they are being grown, non-vascular plants like mosses are out of our area of expertise. However, we will take a look online and see if we can find some websites that will help you answer that question.

U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station Vascular and non-vascular plant community

Diversity:Plants Non-vascular plants

U.S. Department of Energy: Ask a scientist Vascular vs. non-vascular

Cartage.org Non-vascular plants

Wikipedia Vascular plants

Wikipedia Non-vascular plants

 

 

 

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