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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Wednesday - September 02, 2009

From: Willingboro, NJ
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Problem with non-native peach tree in Willingboro NJ
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have a peach tree in my back yard. The tree was in the yard when I bought the house. I have lived at my address almost six years. This year the peach tree is dripping a thick jelly-like sap from everywhere. I have never seen this before. Can you tell me why it is doing this? Am I losing this peach tree?

ANSWER:

If it is any comfort to you, you are not the only gardener with this problem. To quote from a recent answer from Mr. Smarty Plants:

"Peach, Prunus persica, is a non-native species and is outside our area of expertise.  However, we may be able to help some.  The culprit is likely Stinkbug, but other insects including Peach twig borer, Plum curculio, and Green June beetle are all possibilities.  A fungal disease is less likely based on your description of the problem." 

You should first contact the Rutgers Cooperative Extension Office for Burlington County to find out how to positively identify the cause of the damage to your fruit.  When you have determined the ID of the pest, your extension agent will be able to make recommendations about how to protect your crop.

 

 

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