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Monday - August 24, 2009

From: Round Top, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Seed and Plant Sources
Title: Source for purchase of Texas ash tree in Round Rock, TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Where can I purchase a Texas Ash (Fraxinus texenis)?

ANSWER:

Fraxinus texensis (Texas ash) grows natively in Central Texas, and is a well-adapted tree for this area. However, you don't want to be purchasing ANY tree, and certainly not planting one, right now. We are, as you know, in a protracted heat and dry wave and just about anything planted now would probably go into transplant shock. Nor do you want to buy a tree from nursery stock that has possibly been in a container for 1 to 2 years, and is root-bound. 

Go to our Native Plant Suppliers directory, type the name of your town and state into the "Enter Search Locaton" box and you will get a list of native plant nurseries, seed companies and environmental and landscape consultants in your general area. You could go ahead and contact them now, inquire if they are going to be stocking the tree you want, and when the new stock will be in. Do not, repeat DO NOT allow anyone to talk you into buying something they have in the nursery now, for the reasons we have already cited. Patience is the key, wait for the cool weather and the rain, and your more freshly dug little tree will have a much higher probability of surviving the transplant.

From our Native Plant Image Gallery 


Fraxinus texensis

Fraxinus texensis

Fraxinus texensis

Fraxinus texensis

 

 

 

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