En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
1 rating

Monday - August 24, 2009

From: Ponder, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Vines
Title: Pipevine (Aristolochia sp.) found in Denton County Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am almost positive that I have numerous pipevine swallowtail in my garden in Denton County, TX. I read that the host plant for the larva is almost exclusively pipevine. Would any kind of pipevine be growing wild in my area? If so, which one? The butterflies are so fresh, they must be hatching here. I'm really curious!

ANSWER:

There are two species of pipevine plants that occur in Denton County Texas according to the USDA Plants Database:

Aristolochia tomentosa (woolly dutchman's pipe) and more photos

Aristolochia erecta (swanflower) and more photos

Some people have also been growing tropical species of Aristolochia in their gardens in the Houston area so it is possible that the butterflies have found these growing in gardens in Denton County.  The most popular ones are Aristolochia elegans (Calico flower), A.grandiflora (Pelican flower), and A. fimbriata.  I am, however, a bit skeptical that these tropical species would survive outdoors as far north as Denton County.

Mr. Smarty Plants recently answered some other questions about the Battus philenor (Pipevine swallowtail) and its host plants.  You can read them at the following links: #4460, #3948 and #430.


Aristolochia tomentosa

Aristolochia erecta

Aristolochia erecta

Aristolochia erecta

 

 

 

More Vines Questions

Identification of vine-like plant.
November 13, 2010 - I have a an odd plant that I bought years ago. It's like a vine. It has hard rubbery like leaves they turn inward and they are green. First a cone like shape grows then the leaves grow. I would like ...
view the full question and answer

Folsom CA Wall-cover
April 13, 2012 - I live in Folsom, CA and I have an ugly cinder block wall that I want to cover, I want something that is low maintenance and that is going to grow and spread into my grass. The only one i can really t...
view the full question and answer

Native plants with little sun and northern exposure for New York
April 26, 2006 - I live in a co-op and want to fix up the backyard. The backyard area has a west area to plant with a northern exposure and little sun and I am looking to plant something to cover the area. I would lik...
view the full question and answer

Identification of shrub looking like honeysuckle in Odessa TX
October 02, 2011 - Bought a shrub in Pecos, TX yesterday. It looks like honeysuckle but the brightest flat orange I have ever seen. Flower and greenery looked like honeysuckle but when I looked on the Internet under or...
view the full question and answer

Will trumpet vine strangle tulip poplar in Elkview WV?
April 08, 2010 - I have a trumpet vine that I planted to grow up a tulip poplar. I did not find info that it may damage the tree prior to doing this but have recently been told that it will "strangle" the tree. Is...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center