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Tuesday - August 04, 2009

From: Luling, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Propagation of Mexican olive in Luling, TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Mr. Smarty Plants: we live in Luling, just south of Austin and have a 4 year old Mexican Olive tree; question: how do we propagate this 'hard to find' tree? Thank you so much.

ANSWER:

Cordia boissieri (anacahuita), according to our Native Plant Database is propagated by seeds. From this USDA Plant Profile on this plant, it is native to far South Texas, but apparently there are reports of some being grown in Central Texas, around Travis County. According to this USDA Forest Service website, Cordia boisseri, it is rarely found and may be close to extinction.

It apparently can not only be propagated by seeds sown just after a frost and air layering, but also by herbaceous or softwood cuttings. Since you already have a tree to be a source for these materials, we suggest you try one or all of those methods.

From Top Tropicals, we found this picture of the seed.

From Washington State University, Propagating Herbaceous Plants from Cuttings

From Fine Gardening magazine, Propagate Your Shrubs from Softwood Cuttings

From North Carolina State University Horticulture Information Leaflet Plant Propagation by Layering by Erv Evans


Cordia boissieri

Cordia boissieri

Cordia boissieri

 

 

 

 

 

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