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Tuesday - August 04, 2009

From: Beacon, NY
Region: Northeast
Topic: Shrubs
Title: Shrubs growing in riparian areas of Hudson River, NY
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

What are the five most common native shrubs that grow in riparian areas in Hudson Valley? Interested especially in plants that grow near/along the Hudson River (as opposed to inland woodland freshwater tributaries). Thank you!

ANSWER:

We are not familiar enough with the geography of New York to be as specific as you might like us to be. We located Beacon, in Duchess County and also the route of the Hudson River. Since we understand that quite a bit of the Hudson is actually considered an estuary, a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more streams flowing into it and free connection to the sea, that adds to our puzzle. Probably the best we can do is see how many shrubs we can locate that tolerate very wet soils and are native to areas along the Hudson. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is dedicated to the use, care and propagation of plants native not only to North America but to the area in which they are being grown. 

In terms of "common" shrubs, we have no idea which would be most common, and don't know how you would find out without getting out and counting. You could contact the Cornell Cooperative Extension Office Dutchess County to see if they have any information on riparian species. 

You might be interested in these websites:

Natural History of the Hudson River - the river that runs both ways, a portion of the website A Virtual Trip on the Historic Hudson River.

Brooklyn Botanic Garden New York Metropolitan Flora Project

The Nature Conservancy Hudson River Estuary Program

Wetland Shrubs Native to New York Along the Hudson River

Alnus serrulata (hazel alder)

Andromeda polifolia (bog rosemary)

Cephalanthus occidentalis (common buttonbush)

Chamaedaphne calyculata (leatherleaf)

Cornus amomum (silky dogwood)

Lindera benzoin (northern spicebush)

Physocarpus opulifolius (common ninebark)

Rhododendron viscosum (swamp azalea)

Rosa palustris (swamp rose)

Salix humilis (prairie willow)

Salix bebbiana (Bebb willow)

Sambucus nigra ssp. canadensis (common elderberry)

Pictures from our Native Plant Database Image Gallery


Alnus serrulata

Andromeda polifolia

Cephalanthus occidentalis

Chamaedaphne calyculata

Cornus amomum

Lindera benzoin

Physocarpus opulifolius

Rhododendron viscosum

Rosa palustris

Salix humilis

Salix bebbiana

Sambucus nigra ssp. canadensis

 

 

 

 

 

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