En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Sunday - August 16, 2009

From: Arlington, VA
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Trees
Title: Pine trees for West Virginia
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I have two acres in the Canaan Valley, West Va. and would like to plant pine trees. What type would you recommend that the deers won't eat and the cold climate won't kill.

ANSWER:

There are seven species of pines native to West Virginia and all of them either occur in Tucker County or in a county adjacent to it.  All pines are somewhat resistant to deer and all except the first two on the list are also named on deer resistant lists.  All of these species can withstand cold temperatures that occur in West Virginia since they are native to the area, plus most of them also occur in states and provinces north of your state.

Pinus banksiana (jack pine) and here are photos and more information from Virginia Tech and the US Forest Service.

Pinus pungens (Table Mountain pine) and here are photos and more information from Virginia Tech and the US Forest Service.

Pinus rigida (pitch pine) is deer resistant according to TreeNames.net and the Delaware Fish and Wildlife Department.  Here are photos and more information from the University of Connecticut and the US Forest Service.

Pinus strobus (eastern white pine) is deer resistant according to TreeNames.net.  Here is information from the US Forest Service.

Pinus virginiana (Virginia pine) is deer resistant according to the Delaware Fish and Wildlife Department.  Here is information from the US Forest Service.

Pinus echinata (shortleaf pine) is deer resistant according to the Delaware Fish and Wildlife Department.  Here is information from the US Forest Service.

Pinus resinosa (red pine) is deer resistant according to is deer resistant according to TreeNames.net and Twombly Nursery in Monroe, Connecticut.  Here are more photos and information from the University of Connecticut and the US Forest Service.


Pinus strobus

Pinus virginiana

Pinus echinata

 

 

More Trees Questions

Placement of lemon cypress tree in Miami, FL
May 25, 2008 - Where is the best place to have a lemon cypress tree? indoors or out? Presently in south Miami climate, Scott's potting soil, clay pot, with good drainage.
view the full question and answer

Need suggestions for a small tree for cemetery in NH.
August 30, 2012 - I would like suggestions for picking a SMALL tree for a rural cemetery in Winchester, NEW HAMPSHIRE. Would the delicate Japanese Elm be suitable for the weather, etc?
view the full question and answer

Trees blooming white in Austin area
March 16, 2010 - 3/16/10 What are the trees that are blooming white in the Austin area. They are a full tree and very prolific in the area.
view the full question and answer

Viability of Desert Willow in clay soil in Fredericksburg, TX
November 25, 2005 - I have recently purchased a house in a new subdivision in Fredericksburg, TX. The lot was not landscaped. I have a small lot (85 X 135), my back yard is about 50 X 85. The soil is a heavy clay. I am c...
view the full question and answer

Problems with tuliptree in North Salem IN
September 02, 2009 - I have a tulip tree and it looks like it is dying. The limbs are starting to turn bright blue. Do I have an insect problem or is it from a lightning strike?
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center