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Thursday - July 30, 2009

From: Dallas, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Shade Tolerant
Title: What plant grows in extremely hot Texas weather in the shade in Dallas Texas?
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

What plant grows in extremely hot Texas weather in the shade?

ANSWER:

If we were to rephrase your question, would it look something like this? "Could you recommend a plant that can grow in the shade in Dallas Texas?"  Yes I can, with your help.

Lets go to our Recommended  Species list and click North Central Texas on the map. This will give you a list of 105 commercially available native plant species suitable for planned landscapes in North Central Texas. If we go to the Narrow Your Search column on the right side of the page, we can make some choices that can trim our list. The first choice is easy; select Texas under State. Under General Appearance and Lifespan there are several choices, but let's choose  Herb and Perennial for now. Choose Shade under Light Requirement, Moist under Soil Moisture and scroll down and click the "Narrow your search"button.

Our list has been trimmed down to 2. Clicking on the name of each plant will pull up its NPIN page that has plant characteristics, growing information, and images.

You can generate different lists by changing your choices under General Appearance, Lifespan, and Soil Moisture. After finding some prospects, our Suppliers Directory  can help you find businesses in the Dallas area that sell native plants.

 

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