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Friday - July 17, 2009

From: Toms River, NJ
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Vines
Title: Propagate a trumpet vine from a cutting in Toms River NJ
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Can you propagate a trumpet vine from a cutting?

ANSWER:

Campsis radicans (trumpet creeper) is native to New Jersey, and hopefully the cooler climate would help to control this sometimes aggressively spreading plant. In the South it can escape cultivation and become invasive. To quote from our webpage on the plant:

"This vine is often cultivated for its attractive flowers and can escape cultivation. It climbs by means of aeriel rootlets on the stem and can be undesirably aggressive in the South. In fallow fields its prostrate stems - for which it is sometimes called Devils Shoestrings - stretch for many feet, sometimes tripping unwary walkers. Another common name, Hellvine, reflects the opinion of some people regarding the plant."

In short, if there is one around, you might not need to take cuttings, just wait a little while and the vines will come to you. It spreads by suckering or by seeding. This Floridata website on Campsis radicans will give you more information, and also has this to say about its propagation:

"Propagation: Seeds. Trumpet vine suckers freely from the roots, which can be easily transplanted."

You could very likely propagate a trumpet vine from a cutting, but it would seem there are easier ways to do so. 

 

 

 

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