En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Native grass to replace St. Augustine in Houston

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
4 ratings

Saturday - July 18, 2009

From: Houston, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Grasses or Grass-like
Title: Native grass to replace St. Augustine in Houston
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I read your answer to the question on the Houston Chronicle's website in relation to watering St. Augustine grass. You referred to St. Augustine as non-native, but from what I can gather St. Augustine is native to the Gulf Coast. While it may not naturally have been as pervasive as it is in people's lawns down here, it is in 99%+ of well kept lawns, so difficult to eschew it as trivial. That being said, I hate St. Augustine grass and have been searching for a replacement for years. You suggest a good "native" grass that is drought and heat tolerant, but you did not name any varieties that I might be able to use. Do you know of any native varieties that will work well in a yard in Houston, especially one that will tolerate moderate shade as well as sun?

ANSWER:

We found our previous answer and you are correct, St. Augustine is native to the Gulf Coast, just not the Texas Gulf Coast, but that is neither here nor there. You are again correct that it is widely used in well-kept lawns, especially in the Houston area where you normally get more rain than we do in the Austin area. Right now, a teacup-full would be more than we are getting. 

We can certainly make some native grass suggestions, including some that will tolerate some shade. However, if you belong to a Homeowner's Association, you are probably bound to having a certain area, at least of your front yard, in a closely-mown lawn, which in Houston would be St. Augustine. In West Texas, you have a better chance with bermudagrass, also non-native, but it is aggressive and has become an invasive weed in parts of the South.

You might read our How-To Article Native Lawns to get an idea of the research that is being done on this very problem. Our favorite native lawn grass is Native Sun Turf, from Native American Seed, which is 34% blue grama and 66% buffalograss. However, the key word here is "sun," which you apparently do not have, or not full sun, which we consider 6 or more hours of sun a day. 

Since we don't know your exact situation in terms of Homeowner's Association rules or how much sun you have, we are going to make some suggestions which may not be practical in your situation, but at least we tried. This probably sounds fanciful, but would you consider a meadow garden? Read our How-To Article on Meadow Gardening and see if it is something you would be willing to do. Let us explain that we are suggesting you do this on a small scale, planting some grasses and perennials native to the Houston area (and we will give you some suggestions), and, if you have to satisfy a Homeowner's Association, just keep making your lawn area smaller and smaller as you increase the amount of decorative grasses and flowering plants. None of these native grasses will be mowable, but just need to be cut down to about 6 inches early in the Spring every year. 

We will find our suggestions, and you can find many more, by going to Recommended Species, clicking on East Texas on the map, and selecting first on "Grasses" under General Appearance, and "Part shade" under Light requirements; then do the same with "Herbs" (herbaceous blooming plants). You can add in any other requirements, different amounts of light, soil moisture, etc. as you build your own list.

Grasses for the Houston Area:

Andropogon gerardii (big bluestem) 4 to 8 ft. tall, warm season perennial, sun or part shade

Bouteloua curtipendula (sideoats grama) - 1 to 3 ft. tall, sun or part shade

Chasmanthium latifolium (Inland sea oats - 2 to 4 ft., part shade or shade

Schizachyrium scoparium (little bluestem) - 3 to 6 ft. tall, sun or part shade

Perennial Blooming Plants for Houston Area:

Asclepias tuberosa (butterfly milkweed) - 1 to 3 ft. tall, blooms orange, yellow May to September, sun or part shade

Coreopsis lanceolata (lanceleaf tickseed) - 1 to 2 ft. tall, evergreen perennial, blooms yellow April to June, sun, part shade, or shade

Echinacea purpurea (eastern purple coneflower) - 2 to 5 ft. tall, perennial, blooms pink, purple April to September, sun or part shade

Monarda fistulosa (wild bergamot) - 2 to 5 ft. tall, perennial,, blooms white, pink, purple May to September, sun or part shade


Andropogon gerardii

Bouteloua curtipendula

Chasmanthium latifolium

Schizachyrium scoparium

Asclepias tuberosa

Coreopsis lanceolata

Echinacea purpurea

Monarda fistulosa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More Grasses or Grass-like Questions

Plants for a slope in WV
June 01, 2011 - I live in the northern panhandle of WV. We have a hill side in front of our home and are getting too old to cut it. What would be the best ground cover for it. We want something that looks good and wi...
view the full question and answer

Steep slope from Charlotte NC
May 03, 2012 - I live near Charlotte, NC and I have a very steep sloped area from the edge of our front yard down to the road. It's a huge eyesore mainly because it is red clay dirt and has nothing growing on it. W...
view the full question and answer

Buffalograss for Houston
July 08, 2008 - Will 609 buffalograss sod perform well in Houston, Texas? I am being told that it will yellow and get filled with weeds and that it won't handle the humidity. Is this all true? Help, please.
view the full question and answer

Nutgrass in Lakeway TX Habiturf
September 30, 2012 - I just installed a new septic system with drip field. Planted habiturf over the whole area. The habiturf is doing good, but I was away for a while and the nut grass has taken over several areas. It s...
view the full question and answer

Source for information on Habiturf from Utopia, TX
February 25, 2014 - During a recent Central Texas Gardener TV show, someone from the Center mentioned that your Habiturf was going to be available as sod from someone in the San Antonio area this spring. Is that true an...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center