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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Sunday - July 24, 2005

From: Las Cruces, NM
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Smarty Plants on Texas Madrone
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Hello, where can one acquire the Texas Madrone for planting? Thank you.

ANSWER:

Visit the National Suppliers Directory on the Wildflower Center webpage where you can find lists of nurseries or seed companies in your area that specialize in native plants. Some of the nurseries will have web addresses where you can check online to see if they carry what you want. Others will have telephone numbers and/or e-mail addresses for contacting. You may or may not be able to easily find the Texas madrone (Arbutus xalapensis) commercially because it is temperamental to propagate and difficult to transplant from the wild. However, doing a quick preliminary search for nurseries in the Southwest I found Natives of Texas near Kerrville, Texas that advertises they "specialize in Texas native plants, with an emphasis on madrones, a beautiful Texas native tree".
 

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