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Sunday - July 05, 2009

From: Lott, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Problems with non-native Indian hawthorns in Lott TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

My Indian Hawthornes have developed brown leaves. I planted them about four years ago and until now they have done very well. I bought some 3 in 1 garden spray for fungus, but I don't know if that is the product I need. Some of the plants look worse than others. Once I get rid of it, how do I keep it from coming back? Thank you for your help.

ANSWER:

Rhaphiolepsis indica, Indian hawthorn, is a native to China, Taiwan and other tropical areas in Asia. At the  Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, we are focused on the care and propagation of plants native not only to North America but to the area in which they are being grown. Because this is out of our expertise and, of course, not found in our Native Plant Database, we found a website with some information on the plant for you. Floridata, Rhaphiolepsis indica indicates that it is very susceptible to leaf spot fungus if grown in shady conditions or over-fertilized. You should avoid overhead watering, such as sprinklers, especially at night. Beyond that, you might try Googling on Rhaphiolepsis indica and see what other information you can find.
 

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