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Saturday - July 04, 2009

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Shade Tolerant
Title: Fast-growing shade tree for Central Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What is the best fastest growing shade tree for central Texas? Thanks

ANSWER:

The following were recommended by the Texas Tree Planting Guide (Texas Forest Service and Texas A&M) as rapidly growing native Texas trees for Travis County:

Quercus polymorpha (netleaf white oak) and more information from the Texas Tree Planting Guide (TTPG).

Quercus shumardii (Shumard's oak) and more information from the TTPG.

Fraxinus texensis (Texas ash) and more information from the TTPG.

Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore) and more information from the TTPG.

Ulmus americana (American elm) and more information from the TTPG.

You will need to compare the "Growing Conditions" given for each tree to the characteristics of your site to determine which would be the best tree for you.

You can also find more information about them at the City of Austin's Native and Adapted Landscape Plants site.


Quercus polymorpha

Quercus polymorpha

Quercus shumardii

Quercus shumardii

Fraxinus texensis

Fraxinus texensis

Platanus occidentalis

Platanus occidentalis

 


Ulmus americana

Ulmus americana
 

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