En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Fast-growing shade tree for Central Texas

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
2 ratings

Saturday - July 04, 2009

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Shade Tolerant
Title: Fast-growing shade tree for Central Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What is the best fastest growing shade tree for central Texas? Thanks

ANSWER:

The following were recommended by the Texas Tree Planting Guide (Texas Forest Service and Texas A&M) as rapidly growing native Texas trees for Travis County:

Quercus polymorpha (netleaf white oak) and more information from the Texas Tree Planting Guide (TTPG).

Quercus shumardii (Shumard's oak) and more information from the TTPG.

Fraxinus texensis (Texas ash) and more information from the TTPG.

Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore) and more information from the TTPG.

Ulmus americana (American elm) and more information from the TTPG.

You will need to compare the "Growing Conditions" given for each tree to the characteristics of your site to determine which would be the best tree for you.

You can also find more information about them at the City of Austin's Native and Adapted Landscape Plants site.


Quercus polymorpha

Quercus polymorpha

Quercus shumardii

Quercus shumardii

Fraxinus texensis

Fraxinus texensis

Platanus occidentalis

Platanus occidentalis

 


Ulmus americana

Ulmus americana
 

More Shade Tolerant Questions

Native flowers and ground cover for damp, shady area in Wisconsin
May 11, 2006 - I would like to plant some flowers and ground cover in the front of my yard near my home. This spot is usually damp and nearly always shaded. Any suggestions? Also I'm looking for blue flowering pla...
view the full question and answer

Plants to replace Polygonum cuspidatum ( Japanese knotweed)
August 10, 2013 - I live in a heavily wooed area of Chippewa Falls, WI. Our property is covered with Giant Japanese Knot Weed. We have been trying to get rid of it for years. We are finally going to try using the dr...
view the full question and answer

Native shade trees for Austin
May 15, 2009 - I am building a new home that does not have any trees close by-- I want to have several shade trees to increase the efficiency of my home. What are your suggestions for an easy care, fast-growing, an...
view the full question and answer

Natives for a raised, part-shade bed in Pearland TX
March 29, 2010 - I have a couple of raised beds that I want to plant a few shrubs (3 feet tall), perennials, and annuals. I want all the plants to be native to Texas. The only problem is that I am not plant knowledgea...
view the full question and answer

Native shade plants for sandy soil in New York
April 30, 2008 - I have a small patch (about 10 feet x 6 feet) of shady ground next to my house. The soil is very sandy. I really would like some perennial color - or at this point, anything actually - that will grow...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center