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Tuesday - June 23, 2009

From: Salt Lake City, UT
Region: Rocky Mountain
Topic: Invasive Plants
Title: How would chocolate mimosa tree do in Salt Lake City
Answered by: Nan Hampton


How would the chocolate Mimosa Tree do here in Salt Lake City, zone 5.


That is a question that I'm afraid Mr. Smarty Plants can't answer for you other than to say we don't recommend planting Albizia julibrissin 'Summer Chocolate' at all.  Not only is this species not native (it originates from Asia), but it is a variety of a species that is considered invasive and is on the Plant Conservation Alliance's Alien Plant Working Group's Least Wanted list.  As a substitute we can offer some Utah native trees that have something of the look of the chocolate mimosa.

Gleditsia triacanthos (honeylocust).  There are thornless varieties and they are hardy to zone 4.

Cercis orbiculata (California redbud.  Here is more information from the US Forest service.

Purshia mexicana (Mexican cliffrose).  Here is more information from Desert USA.

Robinia neomexicana (New Mexico locust)

Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust)

Gleditsia triacanthos

Cercis orbiculata

Purshia mexicana

Robinia neomexicana

Robinia pseudoacacia





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