En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
1 rating

Monday - June 22, 2009

From: Lebanon, NH
Region: Northeast
Topic: Propagation
Title: How does Graptopetalum filiferum produce seeds?
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Hi I have a Graptopetalum filiferum. I found a seed on top of one of the plants and it resembles something like a cantelope melon seed-about 1/3" long, orange. Do these succulents produce seeds in such a manner? Thanks

ANSWER:

There are two Graptopetalum species (Family Crassulaceae) that are North American natives, G. bartramii (Patagonia Mountain leatherpetal) and G. rusbyi (San Francisco River leatherpetal), but according to www.crassulaceae.com, G. filiferum is a Mexican species.  It is reported to be  "difficult in cultivation" and "reproduces itself with many suckers" and the info also says that reproduction is by seed.  USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) says that the seeds of the plants in the Family Crassulaceae (Stonecrop Family) are less than 1 mm long.  Some members of the Crassulaceae (including G. macdougallii) reproduce by making plantlets (also called bulbils or gemmae). ZipCodeZoo.com says the seeds of G. filiferum are 'small' but it does not mention whether it also produces plantlets. If your G. filiferum did not have a stalk and flowers like the ones in the pictures on the www.crassulaceae.com page, then what you found on your plant was not a seed.  It could have been a plantlet, I suppose, but I don't find clear evidence that this species produces plantlets.

 


 

More Propagation Questions

Wildflower garden with Castilleja indivisa (Indian paintbrush)
January 08, 2013 - I want to start a wildflower garden in my front/backyard. Specifically, I would like to include the indian paintbrush. What is the best way to go about this? Straight in the ground, containers, etc...
view the full question and answer

Planting iris rhizomes in Wisconsin
October 10, 2008 - I live in central WI and was given some iris bulbs (think they are called Rhizomes) and have no idea how to go about planting them. I am very new to planting so step by step instructions with good de...
view the full question and answer

Killing a century plant from Burton TX
August 08, 2013 - How do you kill the century plant, they are taking over?
view the full question and answer

Loss of bloom stalk on Yucca filamentosa from Scotch Plains NJ
April 27, 2013 - We have 3 Yucca filamentosa L. planted together, in NJ. A friend of ours was helping to remove the weeds, little did she know and removed the blooming stalk from the plants. By the time I saw, it was ...
view the full question and answer

Should a bloom stalk be cut down in Yuma AZ?
May 07, 2010 - I have a plant in my front yard that looks like an aloe vera. It doesn't have any thorns or needles but does have a tall stalk like stem coming from the middle of it. The "stalk" is now approx. 5'...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center