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Friday - June 05, 2009

From: Pearland, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Planting, Transplants, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Care for Blackfoot daisy?
Answered by: Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

Hi, I have two blackfoot daisies and one has died. I've planted them in full sun on a well drained slope. Do these ususally die after blooming? Should I cut the other one back? Thanks.

ANSWER:

Melampodium leucanthum (plains blackfoot) or Blackfoot daisy is a perennial, so no, it does not normally die after flowerering.  However, plants that are transplanted while in flower or shortly before flowering have a much greater chance of succumbing to transplant shock than those that are not flowering.  As difficult a thing as it is to do, gardeners should disbud any perennial plant they're about to transplant to increase its chances of survival.  Cut the other plant back now by about 1/3.  Make sure it doesn't get too dry, but don't keep it too wet, either.  Although Blackfoot daisy prefers full sun, it is a good idea to give it a little protection from late afternoon sun for a few weeks until the plant is well-established.

 

From the Image Gallery


Blackfoot daisy
Melampodium leucanthum

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