En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - June 01, 2009

From: Pickford, MI
Region: Midwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Would mountain ash (Sorbus sp.) grow in Michigan?
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I live in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan between Cedarville (Lake Huron) and Sault Ste. Marie (Lake Superior.) We would like to plant a Mountian Ash because we love birds and they love the berries and would like to know how this tree would do in our climate. Thank you.

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants found six native trees with the common name 'mountain ash':

Sorbus americana (American mountain ash) and its distribution includes Michigan.  Here are more photos.

Sorbus decora (northern mountain ash) and its distribution includes Michigan.  Here are photos.

Sorbus dumosa (Arizona mountain ash) and its distribution does NOT include Michigan.

Sorbus groenlandica (Greenland mountain ash) and its distribution does NOT include Michigan.  Here is a photo.

Sorbus scopulina (Greene's mountain ash) and its distribution does NOT include Michigan.  Here are photos.

Sorbus sitchensis (western mountain ash) and its distribution does NOT include Michigan.  Here are photos.

So, Mr. Smarty Plants says "definitely yes" for the first two—S. americana and S. decora—but unlikely for the other 4 species. 


Sorbus americana

Sorbus americana

Sorbus americana

Sorbus americana

 

 

More Trees Questions

Oak roots damaged by ax from Austin
July 03, 2013 - Hello. I am attempting to create my own tiny copy of the Wildflower Center within my yard. I'm using all native, drought tolerant plants. My front yard is full of live oaks. I used a sod cutter la...
view the full question and answer

Problems with transplanted Texas Madrones from Junction TX
May 13, 2014 - We planted 3 little Texas madrones last year 9 - 12 inches high. 2 of them seem to have some kind of black blight along the edges of the leaves that I don't think was the result of our late freezes. ...
view the full question and answer

Growing a Swamp Oak from Seed
July 02, 2014 - I have a swamp oak that I started from an acorn. Someone at a nursery stated that after 4 years I should cut it off at ground level and then allow one of the suckers to grow while keep removing the ot...
view the full question and answer

Possibility of saving hurricane-damaged Umbrella Magnolia
October 12, 2005 - Our beautiful umbrella magnolia Magnoliaceae Magnolia tripetala was toppled during Hurricane Katrina. We have lifted it back in place, however it looks very distressed. I have the following questions:...
view the full question and answer

Eastern red cedar as tall privacy hedge for North Texas
February 28, 2006 - I live in Northern Texas, outside of Dallas, and I need a very, very tall hedge to hide the view of the neighbors car lot from our second floor. We see everything beyond his fence and it drastically ...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center