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Monday - June 01, 2009

From: Pickford, MI
Region: Midwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Would mountain ash (Sorbus sp.) grow in Michigan?
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I live in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan between Cedarville (Lake Huron) and Sault Ste. Marie (Lake Superior.) We would like to plant a Mountian Ash because we love birds and they love the berries and would like to know how this tree would do in our climate. Thank you.

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants found six native trees with the common name 'mountain ash':

Sorbus americana (American mountain ash) and its distribution includes Michigan.  Here are more photos.

Sorbus decora (northern mountain ash) and its distribution includes Michigan.  Here are photos.

Sorbus dumosa (Arizona mountain ash) and its distribution does NOT include Michigan.

Sorbus groenlandica (Greenland mountain ash) and its distribution does NOT include Michigan.  Here is a photo.

Sorbus scopulina (Greene's mountain ash) and its distribution does NOT include Michigan.  Here are photos.

Sorbus sitchensis (western mountain ash) and its distribution does NOT include Michigan.  Here are photos.

So, Mr. Smarty Plants says "definitely yes" for the first two—S. americana and S. decora—but unlikely for the other 4 species. 


Sorbus americana

Sorbus americana

Sorbus americana

Sorbus americana

 

 

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