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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Thursday - May 14, 2009

From: Broomfield, CO
Region: Rocky Mountain
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Planting conditions for non-native Oriental poppy in Colorado
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I live in Broomfield, CO. Is this a good time to plant oriental poppies, what is the best sun exposure and how should I prepare the soil?

ANSWER:

Although there are several members of the Papaver genus that are native to North America, we found only one native to Colorado, Papaver radicatum (rooted poppy). Papaver orientale (Oriental poppy) is native to Central Asia, and therefore falls outside the range of expertise of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, where we are committed to the care, protection and propagation of plants native not only to North America but also to the area in which the plants are being grown. However, we found a website from backyardgardener Papaver, Oriental Poppy, Iceland Poppy which should have some information to help you. 

 

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