Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
3 ratings

Monday - April 27, 2009

From: Federal Way, WA
Region: Northwest
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Problems with non-native Star jasmine
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

My Jasmine leaves are turning red. I think it's a Star Jasmine as it get those pretty little white fragrant flowers that look like a star. What is causing this and is it something I should be concerned with? If it's a disease, how would I treat it? Thank you Sue

ANSWER:

There are three plants native to North America with "jasmine" in one of their common names. They are:

Androsace chamaejasme ssp. lehmanniana (Lehmann's rockjasmine) - native to Alaska and Montana

Androsace septentrionalis (pygmyflower rockjasmine) - native to Washington

Clematis crispa (swamp leather flower) - not native to Washington

You can follow the links to these plants, and look at the pictures, but we're pretty sure your plant is none of the above. The description sounds like Trachelospermum jasminoides,  also known as Star jasmine, or Confederate jasmine.This plant, in spite of the common names, is not native to North America. At the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, we only deal with plants native not only to North America but also to the area in which they are being grown. Since we have no information in our Native Plant Database on plants outside our expertise, we are referring you to this Floridata website, Trachelospermum jasminoides for more information and the possible answer to your question. 


Androsace chamaejasme ssp. lehmanniana

Androsace septentrionalis

Clematis crispa

 

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Non-native purple lantana
January 05, 2008 - I have found some purple trailing lantana on our land. (This land has never been inhabited, as far as I know of.) This is not one of the yellow/pink or yellow/red native varieties. Is this indeed a...
view the full question and answer

Are Verbena Annuals Deer Resistant?
March 25, 2015 - Are Verbena Estrella Pink Star annuals deer resistant?
view the full question and answer

Trimming spineless yucca in Chicago
April 05, 2011 - I have a spineless yucca (indoors) which is 11 feet tall and thirty-five years old. When the yucca recently started to scrape the ceiling, I moved it away (roughly 20 feet) from the windows to an area...
view the full question and answer

Is a mulberry tree undesirable?
June 27, 2013 - I have a hard time keeping plants alive, so I was happy when a random plant just started growing and thriving about 5 years ago in my yard. My mom (a frequent volunteer at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildf...
view the full question and answer

Diamonds and Rubies plant (Lychnis coronaria)
May 02, 2007 - I recently purchased a plant from the Huntsville, AL Botanical Gardens at their annual plant sale. The name on the plant tag is "Rubies and Diamonds". No one at the Botanical Garden knew the scien...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.