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Tuesday - May 12, 2009

From: Rockmart, GA
Region: Southeast
Topic: Trees
Title: Fragrant tree found in Savannah
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I was in Savannah last weekend and as we were walking through one of the side streets we were hit with the fragrance of Lilac. I grew up around Lilac bushes but never expected a full in bloom single trunk tree. The flowers were different, they kind of looked like a lilac and white thing star. What is the name of the tree that we discovered in Savannah, Georgia? Will it grow in zone 7?

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants isn't at all sure what your tree is, but here are some fragrant trees that you might find in Savannah:

1)  North American native Philadelphus pubescens (hoary mock orange), probably good in Zone 7. Here are additional photos.

2) North American native Osmanthus americanus (devilwood) with additional photos and information.

3)  Asian native Osmanthus fragrans (Tea Olive), which is a bit tender in Zone 7.

If none of these is the fragrant tree you saw and you happen to have a photograph of it, please send it to us and we will do our best to identify it.  Visit Mr. Smarty Plants' Plant Identification page for instructions on submitting photos.


Philadelphus pubescens

Osmanthus americanus

 

 

 

 

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