En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - May 12, 2009

From: Rockmart, GA
Region: Southeast
Topic: Trees
Title: Fragrant tree found in Savannah
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I was in Savannah last weekend and as we were walking through one of the side streets we were hit with the fragrance of Lilac. I grew up around Lilac bushes but never expected a full in bloom single trunk tree. The flowers were different, they kind of looked like a lilac and white thing star. What is the name of the tree that we discovered in Savannah, Georgia? Will it grow in zone 7?

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants isn't at all sure what your tree is, but here are some fragrant trees that you might find in Savannah:

1)  North American native Philadelphus pubescens (hoary mock orange), probably good in Zone 7. Here are additional photos.

2) North American native Osmanthus americanus (devilwood) with additional photos and information.

3)  Asian native Osmanthus fragrans (Tea Olive), which is a bit tender in Zone 7.

If none of these is the fragrant tree you saw and you happen to have a photograph of it, please send it to us and we will do our best to identify it.  Visit Mr. Smarty Plants' Plant Identification page for instructions on submitting photos.


Philadelphus pubescens

Osmanthus americanus

 

 

 

 

More Trees Questions

Erosion Solution for Lorton, VA
February 07, 2014 - We have a steep slope in our common area of our homeowners association. Trees that were planted have died. It is a large area around a pond. What should we plant that will hold the soil? The soil...
view the full question and answer

Failure to bloom of 4-year-old redbud in Rochester, NY
May 20, 2009 - I planted a redbud four years ago and it still hasn't flowered - it does get the lovely leaves. When I planted it it was only an 18 inch stick. How long before it will bloom or is something wrong?
view the full question and answer

How close to plant Prunus carolinia for a privacy buffer in Montgomery, TX.
December 16, 2010 - I recently purchased some Prunus caroliniana trees for a privacy buffer between my neighbor and me. I have not yet planted them. They are in 25 gallon buckets and are about 10 feet tall now. How mu...
view the full question and answer

Trees around the inland waterways in Virginia
August 07, 2010 - I am writing a piece about Virginia Beach, Virginia. Could you tell me other than Pine what trees are found in the forests around the inland waterways? Thank-you very much!
view the full question and answer

Trees for property in Nevada
April 06, 2013 - Mr. Smarty Plants: I would like to plant trees in between Crepe Myrtles than put up a fence along the paved road. The temperature ranges from 27'F to 130'F. It is a full sun all day and I will i...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center