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A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Tuesday - April 21, 2009

From: Wylie, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: How long do bluebonnets last?
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

How long do bluebonnets last? When should I no longer expect to see the beautiful state flower along the side of the road? I want to know how long I have to take memorable pictures of my children. Thanks.

ANSWER:

We would advise you not to waste any time getting your pictures. No one can say for sure when or where the bluebonnets will bloom the best, or fade away. You can go to the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center 2009 Wildflower Forecast for some information. Note the webcam page at the bottom of the page on this site: you will see that the bluebonnets in the cam view at the Wildflower Center have already gone to seed. Since Wylie is in North Texas, you may still have time, because ordinarily the blooming progresses from south to north in Texas. 

Other sources include Lonestar Internet, Inc. You can find more routes and information at the Texas Hill Country Wildflower Trail web site. DeWitt County offers its own wildflower site as does Brenham, Texas in Washington County. On the Brenham page, select "Visitor Information", then "Nature Watch" to find their information on wildflowers. We found a Texas Highway Department website, Wildflower Sightings. 

Get your camera and go!

 

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