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Saturday - April 25, 2009

From: Salisbury, CT
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Grasses or Grass-like
Title: Native plants to retain slope in Salisbury, CT
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

We want to plant a newly dug out slope with native plants that will retain the dirt. It is sun to part sun near a lake summer cottage. Thanks!!!

ANSWER:

The best thing for retention of that slope would be a meadow garden, which combines grasses, which are world class erosion preventers, and wildflowers for a pleasant view from your cottage. Begin by reading our How-To Article, Meadow Gardening. We will follow up by going to our Recommended Species section, clicking on Connecticut on the map, and searching for grasses and wildflowers native to your area that you can plant. You can repeat the same process, going to the Native Plant Database for the grasses, and make your own choices. Follow the plant links to each individual plant webpage to learn propagation techniques, amount of moisture needed,etc.

Herbaceous blooming plants

Achillea millefolium (common yarrow) - perennial, 1 to 3 ft. tall, blooms white, pink April to September, sun, part shade

Asclepias tuberosa (butterfly milkweed) - perennial, 1 to 2 ft., deciduous, blooms orange, yellow May to september, sun, part shade

Anemone canadensis (Canadian anemone) - perennial, 1 to 2 ft., blooms white April to June, part shade, shade

Chamerion angustifolium ssp. angustifolium (fireweed) - perennial, 3 to 5 ft. tall, blooms white, piink purple June to August, sun

Conoclinium coelestinum (blue mistflower) - perennial to 3 ft., blooms blue, purple July to November, sun, part shade

Coreopsis lanceolata (lanceleaf tickseed) - perennial to 1 ft. tall, blooms yellow April to June,

Lobelia siphilitica (great blue lobelia) - perenial, 2 to 3 ft., blooms blue July to October, sun to shade

Monarda didyma (scarlet beebalm) - perennial, 3 ft., blooms red May to October, sun, pat shade

Grasses

Andropogon gerardii (big bluestem) - warn season perennial, 4 to 8 ft. tall, sun, part shade

Bouteloua curtipendula (sideoats grama) - warm season perennial, 1 to 3 ft., sun, part shade

Bouteloua gracilis (blue grama) - perennial, 1 to 3 ft., sun

Calamagrostis canadensis (bluejoint) - perennial, 3 to 5 ft, sun to shade

Elymus canadensis (Canada wildrye) - cool season perennial, deciduous, 3 to 6 ft., sun, part shade

Muhlenbergia capillaris (hairawn muhly) - perennial, 1 to 3 ft., sun

Schizachyrium scoparium (little bluestem) - perennial, 18 to 24 inches, sun, part shade

Tripsacum dactyloides (eastern gamagrass) - perennial, 3 to 6 ft. part shade


Achillea millefolium

Asclepias tuberosa

Anemone canadensis

Chamerion angustifolium ssp. angustifolium

Conoclinium coelestinum

Coreopsis lanceolata

Lobelia siphilitica

Monarda didyma

Andropogon gerardii

Bouteloua curtipendula

Bouteloua gracilis

Calamagrostis canadensis

Elymus canadensis

Muhlenbergia capillaris

Schizachyrium scoparium

Tripsacum dactyloides

 

 

 

 

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