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A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Sunday - April 26, 2009

From: Maryville, TN
Region: Southeast
Topic: Poisonous Plants
Title: Are dogwood trees poisonous to horses?
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Are dogwood trees poisonous to horses?

ANSWER:

None of the Cornus species (Dogwood) are listed in Mr. Smarty Plants' favorite toxic plant databases (Poisonous Plants of North Carolina, Cornell University Plants Poisonous to Livestock, Canadian Poisonous Plants Information System, University of Pennsylvania Poisonous Plants, or Texas Toxic Plant Database).  Also, none of the dogwoods appear in the following databases dedicated to plants toxic to horses:  10 Most Poisonous Plants for Horses from EquiSearch.com, Poisonous Plants from Trailblazer Magazine, Toxic Plants:  Horses from the ASPCA, and Horse Nutrition:  Poisonous Plants from Ohio State University.  Given the widespread occurrence of dogwoods in planned landscapes as well as in natural settings and the fact that no dogwoods appear on any of the lists of toxic plants, I think we can conclude that your horses will be safe with dogwoods in their pasture.

By the way, you can see which Cornus species (Dogwood) occur in Tennessee by using the NARROW YOUR SEARCH option at the top of the list and selecting 'Tennessee' from the Select State or Province option.  

 

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