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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Saturday - April 18, 2009

From: Tyler, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Bluebonnets in East Texas
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I would love to introduce Bluebonnets onto a piece of property in East Texas. We have very sandy soil. Which species should I plant, the Lupinus Texensis or the Lupinus Subcarnosus?

ANSWER:

According to this USDA Plant Profile for Lupinus subcarnosus (Texas bluebonnet) appears in counties in South and East Texas. If you follow the plant link to the individual webpage on that plant, you will see that it does well in sun and deep sand. The USDA Plant Profile for Lupinus texensis (Texas bluebonnet) shows it not occurring nearly as much in East Texas as the rest of the state; however, the webpage says it can tolerate many different soils, including sand and sandy loam. Under the circumstances, I think you could plant whichever one you chose, and it would do all right. 

If you have not done so already, read our How-To Article on How to Grow Bluebonnets, which has step by step instructions and hints. 


Lupinus texensis

Lupinus texensis

Lupinus subcarnosus

Lupinus subcarnosus

 

 

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