En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?


Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Sunday - May 08, 2005

From: snow hill, MD
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Propagation
Title: Propagation of Emory Oak acorns
Answered by: Nan Hampton


Dear Wildflower Experts, By any chance do you know how we could obtain some Emory Oak acorns to plant on our farm on the Eastern Shore of Maryland? I know its not a given that the trees would grow well here, but the tree is named after one of our ancestors, William Hemsley Emory, and so wed like to try to grow some in our garden. Almost any plant that can take heat manages pretty well here. Many thanks for your ideas.


According to Benny J. Simpson in "A Field Guide to Texas Trees" (1999, Houston: Lone Star Books), the Emory oak (Quercus emoryi) grows in the mountains of the Trans-Pecos region of Texas (Hudspeth, Culberson, Jeff Davis, and Presidio counties) at elevations of 4500 feet and above. It also occurs in Arizona, New Mexico and northern Mexico. Simpson also says that the Emory oak requires "acid soils of igneous origins and will not grow on alkaline soils." You can read more information from the U. S. Forest Service, you can also read about it in the Texas A&M Aggie Horticulture database, and you can see more picutres from Arizona State University. Given the differences in the native climate and environmental conditions for the Emory oak and those that exist on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, I have serious doubts that it will thrive where you live. However, I certainly understand your wish to try it. My suggestion for finding acorns is to contact the Texas Cooperative Extension Office in one of the Texas counties listed above. Perhaps they could refer you to source for acorns.

More Propagation Questions

Growing Texas wildflowers indoors for a March wedding from Austin
October 01, 2013 - I have learned so much from this site! Thank you! I am getting Married this March and I am hoping to use Texas wildflowers for the centerpieces. I hope to grow them in containers indoors and have the ...
view the full question and answer

Resprouting of native prairie plants after snowstorm
April 07, 2007 - Will my prairie plants that have broken dormancy be harmed by a spring snowstorm? Temperatures have fallen down into the twenties and forecast to stay sub-freezing for five or six days. We have abou...
view the full question and answer

Propagation of Pacific dogwood
November 21, 2015 - When do I plant Pacific dogwood seeds? How deep and far apart should they be planted? The elevation will be around 5k.
view the full question and answer

Propagation of Eastern Redbud
March 25, 2005 - I have collected seeds from an Eastern Redbud (Cercis canadensis L.) and I want to learn how to germinate them. How can I find out this information?
view the full question and answer

Comparative speeds of flowering from seeds or bulbs
March 24, 2006 - Does a seed flower grow faster than a bulb flower?
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center