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Wednesday - March 11, 2009

From: Richardson, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Pruning, Shrubs
Title: Trimming a rock rose in Richardson TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have a Rock Rose (Pavonia lasiopetala)in my garden. I cannot find any information on how to trim or whether I should trim this plant. If so when? Mine is pretty much growing all over the place and I'd like to shape it up some.

ANSWER:

Pavonia lasiopetala (Texas swampmallow) or rock rose, among other common names, is ordinarily only woody at its base. It definitely benefits from pruning, and if you don't want volunteers coming up under your shrub, deadhead the blooms before they form seed. To keep this plant blooming and prevent legginess, it can be pruned throughout the growing season. Because it is herbaceous above the woody base, it can be trimmed back pretty hard before the foliage appears in the Spring. Continuing light pruning throughout the growing season will maintain denser foliage, keep it from sprawling and encourage more blooms. The pavonia is said to be short-lived, 3 to 6 years, but can be easily propagated from seedlings or softwood cuttings. It is considered hardy from USDA Hardiness Zones 8 to 9, and Richardson appears to be between Zones 7a to 8a. You obviously have it in a warm, sheltered spot, and it should do just fine.


Pavonia lasiopetala

Pavonia lasiopetala

Pavonia lasiopetala

Pavonia lasiopetala

 

 

 

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