Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Sunday - March 15, 2009

From: Topeka, KS
Region: Midwest
Topic: Shrubs
Title: Fast-growing shrub or tree to block dust from dirt road
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I live on a dirt road in Northeast Kansas. Could you recommend a fast growing, low maintenance shrub/bush or small tree that will form a barrier to block the dust from the dirt road? It will be planted along a chainlink fence. Thanks

ANSWER:

Here are several possibilities for shrubs and small trees to help with your dust problem.

Euonymus atropurpureus (burningbush) and more information from Illinois Wildflowers

Physocarpus opulifolius (common ninebark)

Salix humilis (prairie willow)

Cornus drummondii (roughleaf dogwood)

Fraxinus pennsylvanica (green ash)

Juniperus virginiana (eastern redcedar) can grow into a large tree (>40 feet) and is not particularly fast-growing, but it will form a dense shrub if planted close together and pruned.  It is also evergreen.

Morus rubra (red mulberry)

Prunus angustifolia (Chickasaw plum)

You can find more possibilities by doing a COMBINATION SEARCH in our Native Plant Database selecting 'Kansas' from the Select State or Province option and either 'Shrub' or 'Tree' from the Habitat (general appearance) option.


Euonymus atropurpureus

Physocarpus opulifolius

Salix humilis

Cornus drummondii

Juniperus virginiana

Morus rubra

Prunus angustifolia

 

 

More Shrubs Questions

Growing Dwarf Yaupon Holly in Texas
December 04, 2013 - We planted 10 extra dwarf yaupons in our Austin front yard. They were identified as 'Gremici' dwarf yaupon. I googled them to get more information about them in order to determine why five have di...
view the full question and answer

Is Viburnum rufidulum monoecious or dioecious?
July 28, 2014 - Is Viburnum rufidulum monoecious or dioecious? Your database does not address this for most plants.
view the full question and answer

Epiphytic or halophytic trees and shrubs
December 10, 2008 - Hello I was searching on this issue, but couldn't find what I really want, and I would be great full for your assistance. Please could you help me to find the scientific name for the "Trees" or...
view the full question and answer

Evergreen, flowering hedge shrub for GA.
February 12, 2009 - Hi, there! I am looking for a shrub for planting as a hedge in Decatur, GA. I have hard acidic clay and I would like an evergreen flowering shrub to line the edges of my backyard to separate it from...
view the full question and answer

HOA chopping down wax myrtles from Katy TX
April 24, 2011 - My local HOA just chopped down 80+ wax myrtles saying that they lived out their life span..they are roughly 18-20 years old..is there a species of wax myrtles that lives only 20 years..or did they co...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.