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Mr. Smarty Plants - I need a tall tree with kind roots for a narrow space

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Wednesday - March 11, 2009

From: DALLAS , TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: I need a tall tree with kind roots for a narrow space
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

We have a space in the yard where a building is within 3 to 6 feet of where we would like a tall tree. What tree could achieve two stories in height, while not messing with the foundation of the building? The tree could have a maximum radius of 8 to 9 feet in diameter. We're looking for "kind roots" and good height. Thanks,

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants thinks that a tall tree is not in your future in that location if you are concerned about the foundation.

First we'll talk about tree roots in general, and then offer suggestions for some alternative shrubs that might fit nicely in the space you have.

This link to the Iowa State University Extension is a primer on tree roots in general. I will summarize four issues that are pertinent to your situation.

* The root systems of trees are made up of large, permanent roots (which mainly provide anchorage and transport), and many small, temporary feeder roots and root hairs. It is these small parts of the root system that are the primary water and nutrient absorbers.

* Most tree roots do not penetrate very deeply into the soil. Unless the topsoil is bare or unprotected, trees will concentrate most of their absorbing roots in the top 6 to 18 inches of soil, where water, nutrients, and oxygen can be found.

* Tree root systems cover more area than one might expect -- usually extending out in an irregular pattern 2 to 3 times larger than the crown area. (This could be up to 27 feet for the tree you described.)

* The drip line is the area where much of the water and nutrients are absorbed. This  area on the ground lies approximaely at the edge of the canopy.

Another consideration is the damage that tree roots can do by cracking foundations and sidewalks as they expand, or by causing subsidence as they absorb moisture from under the foundation.

Shrubs, because they lack the massive root systems of trees would present fewer problems in the space you are interested in.

Our Horticulturist suggests two cultivars of Yaupon Ilex vomitoria (yaupon)  that might fit into your landscape. One is Weeping Yaupon, Ilex vomitoria  'Pendula', and the other is Ilex vomitoria 'Will Fleming'.

'Pendula' ; This cultivar is evergreen with a moderate growth rate reaching up to 25' high and 10-12' wide. It can have red berries that persist through the fall into Spring. View pictures.

'Will Fleming' ; If your space is tight, this is the plant for you. It is a moderately growing evergreen reaching up to 12-15', but only 2' wide. (Shaped like an exclamation point.) Unlike 'Pendula', it doesn't produce berries. View pictures.

The down side of this is that neither of these cultivars is likely available at the the "big box stores", however they may be ordered through a good nursery in the Dallas area. If you go to the EXPLORE PLANTS menu on our web site, select "Suppliers", and type  Dallas, Texas in the approproate space, you will get a listing of businesses that sell native plants or seed and provide professional services. By perusing their web sites or using their contact information, you should be able to find these plants.

I was able to find Ilex vomitoria 'Pendula' listed under "trees" at Rohde's Nursery and Nature Store in Garland.

 

 

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