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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Saturday - February 28, 2009

From: Hurst, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Turf
Title: Grass for sunny Texas lawn
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

We lost our front yard(bermuda) last summer/fall due to grubs(we think). When and what type of grass seed do we do this spring to plant a new yard? We can't afford to lay sod. It's mostly sunny. We have not treated the yard with anything. It's all clover & weeds at this point. Thank you!

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants thinks that Bouteloua dactyloides (buffalograss) would be ideal for your mostly sunny yard. Buffalograss, once established, requires little water (less than the non-native bermudagrass) and very little mowing.  Please read our "How to Article", Native Lawns: Buffalograss, for more information about how to sow seeds and prepare your lawn.  You can obtain seeds from one of our Associates, Native American Seed in Junction, Texas.  They offer a seed mixture, Native Sun Turfgrass, that is a mixture of buffalo grass (66%) and another short turf grass, Bouteloua gracilis (blue grama) (34%) that has many advantages—little water required, no mowing or fertilizer and no diseases or pests.  You can also find a very helpful article, Planting Tips for Native Grasses, on their webpage.  Early spring is the time to plant these seeds so you should begin your preparations now.


Bouteloua dactyloides

Bouteloua dactyloides

Bouteloua dactyloides

Bouteloua gracilis

 

 

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