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Mr. Smarty Plants - Roses or other flowering plants for Coleman, Texas

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Tuesday - March 10, 2009

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives, Herbs/Forbs, Shrubs
Title: Roses or other flowering plants for Coleman, Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I want to plant native roses at a country home in Coleman Co., southern exposure, with well water, drip system,but ,hot, dry & windy! I know the Mutabilis does well in Austin, but, is it suitable for West TX? Would appreciate any other suggestions for roses and flowering shrubs. Thanks!

ANSWER:

As lovely as it is Rosa chinensis 'Mutabilis' (China rose) is not a plant native to North America and since our focus and expertise is with plants native to North America, we can't really help in deciding about the suitability of a non-native rose to your area.  I suggest you speak with a reputable nursery in the area or consult the Coleman County Extension Office for advice about non-native roses.  Although there are several native roses that grow in Texas, none of them are shown to grow in, or even near, Coleman County.  There are other flowering shrubs that I can recommend, however, for that area.

Calylophus berlandieri ssp. pinifolius (Berlandier's sundrops)

Ageratina havanensis (Havana snakeroot)

Amorpha fruticosa (desert false indigo)

Eysenhardtia texana (Texas kidneywood)

Lantana urticoides (West Indian shrubverbena)

Leucophyllum frutescens (Texas barometer bush)

Mimosa borealis (fragrant mimosa)

Rhus virens (evergreen sumac)

Senna roemeriana (twoleaf senna)

Salvia greggii (autumn sage)


Calylophus berlandieri ssp. pinifolius

Ageratina havanensis

Amorpha fruticosa

Eysenhardtia texana

Lantana urticoides

Leucophyllum frutescens

Mimosa borealis

Rhus virens

Senna roemeriana

Salvia greggii

 

 

 

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