Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - March 09, 2009

From: North St Paul, MN
Region: Midwest
Topic: Propagation
Title: Will my Lisianthus survive the winter in Minnesota for another growing season?
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

Do you know if Lisianthus plants planted one year, will come back the next year? We bought 6 gorgeous healthy plants last summer from a MN grower. We enjoyed them all last Summer and are wondering if they will survive our winter for another growing season?

ANSWER:

Lisianthus  is one of several common names associated with this plant. It is also referred to as Prairie Gentian, Prairie Rose or Texas Bluebell. The scientific name is Eustoma exaltatum ssp. russellianum (showy prairie gentian). The plants that are grown today are derived from an American wildflower that is native to the prairie from Colorado to Nebraska and down to Texas. The wild, native plant has blue flowers; however, commercial breeders have developed plants with larger blooms in a wide color palette. Our NPIN database describes Lisianthus as an annual, a biennial, or a perennial, depending on where the plant is grown. In the southern part of of its native range, it is a perennial. The survival of your plants is also largely dependent on how they were treated over the winter.

I'm going to refer you to a link where a grower describes his experiences with Lisianthus in Chicago.


Eustoma exaltatum ssp. russellianum

 



 

More Propagation Questions

Difference between white and red berried versions of Callicarpa americana
March 24, 2007 - I have seen many American Beautyberry Bushes [Callicarpa americana] but it was not until I moved into the Big Thicket region that I had ever seen a white berried one. There is no difference botanicall...
view the full question and answer

Looking for seeds or plant of Fendlera wrightii
January 01, 2009 - How I can get a plant or a seed of Fendlera Wrightii, Texas native bush.
view the full question and answer

Rooting hybrid Savannah Holly from cuttings from Gainesville FL
March 04, 2011 - I need instructions on rooting the Savannah Holly from cuttings. I understand that seedlings will not be true to the parent..is this true? Please help. What type of soil mix should I use?
view the full question and answer

Blossoms but no fruit for gooseberries in Enoch UT
January 16, 2010 - My gooseberries always get loads of blossoms, but I never get fruit. I think they need more sun, and thus, want to transplant them to a sunnier location. What (and when) is the best way to do this?
view the full question and answer

Plants for church gardens in Ft. Worth TX
November 07, 2013 - Second attempt. Our church has many gardens in Fort Worth, TX. There are gardens for blue,red,yellow,white,purple,orange,pink,mixed,community garden,roses, and more. I am interested in the la...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.