Explore Plants

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 

Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

rate this answer
1 rating

Wednesday - January 28, 2009

From: Charleston, SC
Region: Southeast
Topic: Seed and Plant Sources
Title: Plants for a new duck pond that are duck proof
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

Sir. I live in Charleston SC. I dug a pond for ducks in my backyard. I want to plant grass and anything else that will grow around the pond that the ducks won't want to eat up. What should I buy to plant? Thank you very kindly.

ANSWER:

One thing to keep in mind is that eating plants is what ducks do, especially young plants. One strategy is to provide the ducks with plants that you don't mind them eating such as sedges and grasses that can deter the ducks from your other ornamentals..

Mr. Smarty Plants will provide a couple of links that deal with maintaining ponds for ducks, and some sugestions for plants to grow around your pond.

One good source is "Plants for Ponds and Pens", in PDF format to download from "Leaflets and Articles" on the British Waterfowl Association page which gives suggestions for establishing plants in duck enclosures. Another is the Metzer Farms Duck and Goose Hatchery whose web site gives some pointers about eastablshing duck ponds.

Here are a few suggestions for your pond:

Common cat-tail Typha latifolia (broadleaf cattail). This typical marsh perennial can form dense stands. Its aggressive growth will need some manaagement.

Yellow fruit Sedge Carex annectens (yellowfruit sedge)

Broomsedge Bluestem  Andropogon virginicus (broomsedge bluestem) 

Swamp Sunflower  Helianthus angustifolius (swamp sunflower) 

Crimson-eyed rose-mallow  Hibiscus moscheutos (crimsoneyed rosemallow)

Cardinalflower  Lobelia cardinalis (cardinalflower)

You can contact the Charleston chapter of the South Carolina Native plant Society for information.

Whatever plants you choose, you might want to check them with the Toxic to Animals database from the Veterinary Medicine Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign just to be safe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More Seed and Plant Sources Questions

Source for dotted blue-eyed grass from Saluda SC
February 23, 2013 - I lived in Texas for several years and now live on acreage in South Carolina. I have heard that bluebonnets don't grow well in South Carolina. However, there is a place by the road near our house t...
view the full question and answer

Sources for cedar and Texas sedge seeds in Central Texas
December 27, 2008 - Where can I buy cedar and Texas sedge seeds in the central Texas area? What will be the cost? I have found a few nurseries who sell 4 inch pots, but that is very costly for the size of area I want to ...
view the full question and answer

Source for native Orobanche plant seeds for research
January 20, 2005 - I'm looking for native Orobanche plant seeds for a research project, but have had no luck so far. We've been able to locate lots of sources for the noxious weed Orobanche (from Europe), but none for...
view the full question and answer

Commercial sources of Virginia creeper
August 19, 2011 - I am looking for Virginia Creeper 'Engelmannii' liners, I have looked through most of your national suppliers directory, only a couple carry vines. Thank you,
view the full question and answer

Source for non-native white Mexican petunias in Panama City, FL
June 23, 2009 - I'm looking for tall white Mexican Petunias. Can you please tell me where I can get some?
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.