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Saturday - January 24, 2009

From: Concord, CA
Region: California
Topic: Non-Natives, Transplants
Title: B1 for transplant shock in non-native bamboo?
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I am wondering about the details as I wish to transplant some bamboo. I do not know the actual variety, as I have at least 2 types, but will take a cutting to a high end nursery.Some of this is about 5 ft tall and some is also about 7 ft tall. I am looking to plant some of this bamboo in clumps and was wondering about using B1 to ward off shock? We are in our rainy season, now so now is our time to do this. Thanks much!

ANSWER:

At the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, our expertise is in plants native to North America. The only plant in our Native Plant Database that even has "bamboo" as one of its common names is Juncus dubius (dubius rush), also referred to as "little bamboo." We're betting that's not what you're talking about. We did find this website from the American Bamboo Society which should have information on it to answer your questions. We would also like to caution you about the invasiveness of this plant. Another website, this one from Georgia, Phyllostachys aurea, Golden Bamboo, discusses some of the problems associated with bamboo. Since invasive plants are frequently a problem in fertile California, you might want to look at our Invasive Plants website, PlantWise, on which the bamboo is listed. 

 

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