Explore Plants

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 

Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - April 19, 2005

From: Blanco, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Invasive Plants, Problem Plants
Title: Methods of controlling poison ivy
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What do you suggest for controlling poison oak (ivy)?

ANSWER:

Since many people are sensitive, some severely, to poison ivy (Toxicodendron spp.), it is not an easy plant to control. If you have a small amount of poison ivy, the sooner you start the easier it will be to control it. The method you use to control it will depend on your sensitivity to the urushiol oil from the plant that causes the itching. If you know that you are sensitive to the urushiol, you might be wise to hire someone who is not sensitive to remove the plants since the most ecologically friendly method for eliminating them is to pull them out of the ground. Pulling them up should include getting as much of the root system out of the ground as possible. The plants will come out of the ground easier if the ground is wet. You (or the person who is removing the plants), even if you believe you are not sensitive to urushiol oil, should protect yourself well while doing this. You should wear gloves, long sleeves, long pants, and boots or shoes with socks. To protect yourself even more you can put your gloved hand in a plastic bag before you grasp the plant to pull it out of the ground. As the plant is pulled out of the ground, the plastic bag can be pulled over the plant to cover it. After you have disposed of the secured plastic bags of plants in the trash, you should thoroughly wash all clothing and yourself. If the plants resprout from any roots that were not removed, you will need to repeat the procedure and try to dig the roots out of the ground. If you are dealing with a large amount of poison ivy to remove, pulling it up may not be practical. In such a case, cutting it near to the ground with long-handled clippers or equivalent device would be better. Shoots will still sprout from the roots, but continued cutting of the shoots should result in starving and killing the roots. It is not recommended to mow the plants since this would shred the plant releasing more of the oil and spreading it everywhere a cut piece is deposited. Burning is also not recommended since the windborn ash from the burning will contain the oil. Tilling the plants under will get rid of the immediate problem but unless the roots are removed, the plants will resprout. Incidentally, if your poison ivy is a vine that has made its way up into a tree, you would be better off severing the vine from the roots in the wintertime when the plant is dormant and the leaves have fallen. Otherwise, you are going to have a tree full of rather unsightly dead poison ivy leaves.

Although we do not generally recommend using herbicides, in the case of a plant that causes severe physical distress like poison ivy, there are herbicides that can be applied if done in a judicious manner. After removing the plants and as much of the roots as possible, you could treat regrowth by painting small amounts of herbicide on sprouting leaves. Painting restricts the herbicide to the plants you want to kill and not to nearby desirable plants. It also eliminates the amount of herbicide you are releasing into the environment. You can read about appropriate herbicides and other methods of control of poison ivy in articles prepared by the Ohio State University Extension Service.

If you have bare skin that has been exposed directly to poison ivy plants, washing with soap and cool water should remove most of the urushiol. Avoid warm water since it may help the oil penetrate the skin. There are products that reportedly remove the urushiol oil from the skin after exposure.

 

More Problem Plants Questions

Can fibrous roots of Chasmanthium latifolium damage house foundation
May 03, 2013 - Dear Mr.Ms. S-P, Can the fibrous roots of inland sea oats cause foundation problems? I was digging around my foundation and found a root about 1" in diameter that I am afraid might be from sea oa...
view the full question and answer

Removal of invasive mints
March 30, 2005 - How do I remove common mint from my garden? I removed the previous years plants and tilled the soil. This year they came back more than before.
view the full question and answer

Getting rid of poison ivy
May 08, 2009 - Dear Mr Smarty Plants, Likewise I also have a shady area in my yard with overgrowth of poison ivy. It borders a small duck pond and we have a Golden Retriever. I too would like to plant soon afterward...
view the full question and answer

Exposed Tree Roots in Austin
September 04, 2012 - I have a large ash tree with a lot of mud at the top of a sloping yard. I want to build a small retaining wall with the ground leveled above. This would entail covering exposed tree roots with 4-18 in...
view the full question and answer

Eliminating bluebonnets from lawn
December 05, 2009 - I need to know the best way to eliminate bluebonnets which are growing in my yard. My HOA is pursuing legal action against me to prevent me growing the plants. I can't afford to "resod" my yard. Ca...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.