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Wednesday - December 31, 2008

From: Tyler, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Tree for area around patio in East Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What is the best type of tree to plant around my patio which faces the southeast

ANSWER:

On our Recommended Species page select the East Texas area from the map or from the pull-down menu and you will get a list of "commercially available native plant species suitable for planned landscapes in East Texas."  You can use the "NARROW YOUR SEARCH" option to limit the list to trees by choosing "Tree" from the Habit (general appearance) option.  This will narrow the list to 44 tree species that will do well in East Texas.  You can then look at the "Plant Characteristics" and "Growing Conditions" to see what best suits your site.  Look also under "Benefit" if you are looking for colorful fall foliage or use by birds and other wildlife.  Here are a few favorites of Mr. Smarty Plants from that list:

Cercis canadensis var. texensis (Texas redbud)

Cornus florida (flowering dogwood)

Frangula caroliniana (Carolina buckthorn)

Fraxinus americana (white ash)

Nyssa sylvatica (blackgum)

Pinus taeda (loblolly pine)

Quercus alba (white oak)

Sassafras albidum (sassafras)


Cercis canadensis var. texensis

Cornus florida

Frangula caroliniana

Fraxinus americana

Nyssa sylvatica

Pinus taeda

Quercus alba

Sassafras albidum

 

 

 

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